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Carlos Castan | DataWorks LLC
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973-358-5405

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Most Businesses Were Unprepared for Covid-19, those who were are delivering!

Companies thriving in a time of touchless transactions, robotics, online commerce and decentralized offices. Their successes may define the business world for a long time to come.​​ See below very informative article from the Wall Street Journal By Greg Ip and Angus Loten |09-2020

Many businesses were operating smoothly prior to March 15th of this year, then suddenly the pandemic hit, and now customers either couldn’t or wouldn’t enter stores and many employees could no longer enter their business offices. Companies like Domino's Pizza quickly reacted and added new ways to bring in business by offering alternative options to hungry customers like curbside pick-up to keep selling pizzas.

The companies best positioned for the Covid era had technology that allowed them to adapt quickly to changing times: touchless transactions, robotics, online commerce or the infrastructure needed to support a decentralized workforce. They are emerging as winners in an economy where customers and workers must avoid contact, offices are empty and travel is limited.

Even as the economy slowly returns to normal, those business models may continue to define and reshape the business world for a long time to come. That is because many changes brought on by Covid-19 are starting to look permanent as customers, workers and companies actually prefer the new ways of doing things. The shift to internet commerce, already underway before the pandemic, will stay. Companies who sent workers home may keep the arrangement because it can raise productivity and cut costs. Once-niche services like telehealth and online education that came into their own during lockdowns will be more important in the future.

Yet not every company will successfully negotiate these transitions—and not every company will have to. There are limits to how far digitization and decentralization can go.

After an initial rush of enthusiasm for work-from-home, many firms have found it makes collaboration, recruitment and integration of new employees harder. And people are social animals who crave the in-person experience, whether that means going to the theater, a restaurant or a doctor.

Even Domino’s acknowledges that there is still something special about interacting with customers in the old-fashioned way. “There’s something to the actual experience of a pizza handoff that is a personal connection,” said Dennis Maloney, the company’s chief innovation officer. “That will probably come back.” 


​Many businesses were operating smoothly prior to March 15th of this year, then suddenly the pandemic hit, and now customers either couldn’t or wouldn’t enter stores and many employees could no longer enter their business offices. Companies like Domino's Pizza quickly reacted and added new ways to bring in business by offering alternative options to hungry customers like curbside pick-up to keep selling pizzas.

The companies best positioned for the Covid era had technology that allowed them to adapt quickly to changing times: touchless transactions, robotics, online commerce or the infrastructure needed to support a decentralized workforce. They are emerging as winners in an economy where customers and workers must avoid contact, offices are empty and travel is limited.

Even as the economy slowly returns to normal, those business models may continue to define and reshape the business world for a long time to come. That is because many changes brought on by Covid-19 are starting to look permanent as customers, workers and companies actually prefer the new ways of doing things. The shift to internet commerce, already underway before the pandemic, will stay. Companies who sent workers home may keep the arrangement because it can raise productivity and cut costs. Once-niche services like telehealth and online education that came into their own during lockdowns will be more important in the future.

Yet not every company will successfully negotiate these transitions—and not every company will have to. There are limits to how far digitization and decentralization can go.

After an initial rush of enthusiasm for work-from-home, many firms have found it makes collaboration, recruitment and integration of new employees harder. And people are social animals who crave the in-person experience, whether that means going to the theater, a restaurant or a doctor.

When Geography Is No Longer a Restraint

Many companies and their employees turned to telecommuting by necessity during the pandemic. Some discovered it had advantages: higher productivity and lower costs such as office space. But over time, its most important edge is likely to be the greater access to talent when geography is no longer a constraint.


​McKinsey & Co. has estimated that global output could be significantly increased simply by better matching talent to jobs through internet based platforms. Christy Johnson, who left her job as a consultant at McKinsey when her daughter was born, said many talented professionals are overlooked because they can’t work 60 to 100 hours a week out of offices in New York or San Francisco. She started Artemis Connection, which provides business strategy advice to midsize companies, to tap this underutilized pool. All 40 of her employees work from home, from California to Wisconsin to Turkey.

Dataworks LLC